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The mechanism that may cause diabetics to develop Parkinson's has been deciphered

Dr. Yifat Miller and Michal Baram (Master's student) from Ben Gurion University presented the connection between amylin and the A-beta peptide responsible for Alzheimer's disease at the international conference of the American Biophysical Society

Parkinson's disease. Illustration: shutterstock
Parkinson's disease. Illustration: shutterstock

Dr. Yifat Miller from the Department of Chemistry at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, together with the doctoral student in her research group, Yoav Atzmon-Raz, succeeded in deciphering the mechanism that can cause diabetics to develop Parkinson's disease.

Dr. Miller has been researching the relationship between diabetes and Alzheimer's disease and between diabetes and Parkinson's disease for three years. According to clinical studies, for over 20 years the connection between diabetes and these diseases has been found, but until now the connection between them has not been deciphered.

Amylin is a hormone found in pancreatic cells and in a pathological state of diabetes the amylin forms aggregates (clusters) that cause the death of the pancreatic cells and thus prevent the secretion of insulin. Also, the amylin is secreted into the blood and transported to a certain area of ​​the brain. Recently, Dr. Miller and Michal Baram (Master's student) presented the connection between amylin and the A-beta peptide that is responsible for Alzheimer's disease In International Conference of the American Biophysical Society  The A-beta peptide found in the brain forms aggregates together with the amylin and thus causes the death of the brain cells and the development of Alzheimer's disease.

Following these findings, Dr. Miller and Atzmon-Rez examined the relationship between amylin and the protein responsible for Parkinson's disease called alpha-synuclein, which is also found in the brain. The main problem to investigate this relationship was that the structure of the alpha-synuclein protein is not known at the atomic level. With the help of computational tools and computational methods, Dr. Miller and Atzmon-Rez were able to decipher the structure of the segment in alpha-synuclein, which is responsible for creating the aggregates.

This is a new and groundbreaking study because, for the first time, the structure at the atomic level of this segment known to be responsible for Parkinson's disease has been resolved. In the next step, Dr. Miller and Atzmon-Raz examined the relationship between the same segment in alpha-synuclein and amylin and found synergistic relationships between them. They discovered that the connection between the amylin and that segment leads to stable aggregates that cause the death of brain cells and subsequently - to Parkinson's disease.

Deciphering the structure of the alpha-synuclein segment will lead to new studies that may explain the mechanism of Parkinson's disease, which until now was not completely clear. In addition, the research will make it possible to develop a drug to reduce the aggregates that cause the death of brain cells in Parkinson's disease. Understanding the relationship between amylin and that segment in alpha-synuclein can lead to groundbreaking research that could develop a drug that would prevent the connection between amylin and that segment in alpha-synuclein and thus prevent diabetics from developing Parkinson's.

Dr. Miller's research is funded by the European Union Fund (EU-FP7 program).

One response

  1. The article suffers from severe syntax problems, which made it difficult for me to understand it. Please correct and read the article again.
    It looks like google translation...

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