Comprehensive coverage

About 97 percent of the attempts end in failure

The low number of live births in each series of attempts to create a clone shows that something basic in the process is not being done correctly, but scientists still do not understand exactly what it is.

Scientists have succeeded in cloning many species of animals - sheep, mice, cows, pigs and even the endangered bison. But, in fact, scientists still do not fully understand how the cloning process works: the low number of live births in each series of attempts to create a clone shows that something basic in the process is not being done correctly, but scientists still do not understand exactly what it is.

Since the birth of Dolly the sheep in '97, cloning has remained a very inefficient process, which may require hundreds of attempts to create an embryo and successfully implant it in the uterus. Usually, only two to three out of every hundred attempts end in the birth of a live offspring.

Precisely for this reason, successful cloning is partly also a "statistical game", in which not only technical expertise plays an important role, but also luck and the possibility of obtaining a large number of eggs.
Therefore, if the Italian-American-Israeli team of doctors did succeed in recruiting 600 women who were convinced to serve as guinea pigs for the birth of the first cloned baby, it is possible that the researchers will eventually succeed in creating a cloned human.

Even when the cloned embryo is successfully implanted in the uterus, the pregnancy often ends in miscarriage. A significant portion of the cloned animals die shortly after birth, and some of the survivors are born with birth defects.

For this reason, scientists such as Prof. Michel Rebel from the Weizmann Institute, and the head of the National Committee for Biotechnology - who estimate that human cloning may be an inevitable scenario in the future - believe that human cloning in today's reality seems a forbidden step ahead of its time.
{Appeared in Haaretz newspaper, 11/3/2001}

The knowledge site was part of the IOL portal from the Haaretz group until the end of 2002

Leave a Reply

Email will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismat to prevent spam messages. Click here to learn how your response data is processed.