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The strict ones won - Pluto loses its status as a planet and becomes a 'dwarf planet'

The astronomers rejected the proposal drawn up by a special committee established by the management of the union, according to which Pluto will remain a planet and three more bodies will be added to this status - Pluto's moon Charon, the asteroid Ceres and the object UB313 known as Xena which was discovered in 2003

Pluto and Charon's Moon
Pluto and Charon's Moon

June 2008 – The past Neptunian dwarf planets will be Plutoids

In the vote that took place today (Thursday) at the International Astronomical Union conference in Prague, it was determined that Pluto will lose its status as a planet. About 2,500 experts participated in the vote held at the union's general meeting. The astronomers rejected the proposal drawn up by a special committee established by the management of the union according to which Pluto will remain a planet and three more bodies will be added to this status - Pluto's moon Charon, the asteroid Ceres and the object UB313 known as Xena which was discovered in 2003.

Pluto has been a member of the solar system since its discovery in 1930 by the American Clyde Tombaugh. In fact now the ninth planet will be deleted from all school and university textbooks.

According to the decision made after a stormy week of debate, the eight planets are: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune.

The original proposal drawn up by a committee of the organization was to increase the number of planets to 12. A compromise proposal - to leave the situation as it is did not even come up for discussion.

Louis Friedman, executive director of the Planetary Society in California, said in an interview with the BBC: "The classification does not matter. Pluto and the other objects in the solar system are mysterious and there are also new worlds that need to be discovered and explored in order to understand them better.

Pluto's status has been disputed for many years because it is much smaller than the other eight planets in the solar system. Since the early 20s, astronomers have discovered several bodies that rival Pluto in size in the region known as the Kuiper Belt.

Some astronomers have long argued that Pluto belongs to this population of icy bodies called "dwarf planets" and not to what we call "planets".

And yet the definition of Pluto being about 2,300 kilometers in diameter is not important, its name will surely remain. He is named after the god of the underworld in Roman mythology. It orbits the Sun in an elliptical orbit whose average distance is 5.9 billion kilometers and takes 247.9 years to orbit the Sun.

An American spacecraft called New Horizons is supposed to pass by Pluto in 2015 and continue to explore the Kuiper Belt itself.

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