Comprehensive coverage

NASA is using a reconnaissance plane to locate the wreckage of Columbia

Special cameras will be activated in the planes that will scan the ground for fragments. Images taken during the flights will be studied to check if the plane, known as ER-2, is able to locate debris

NASA has announced that it is operating a U-2 reconnaissance aircraft to locate debris from the space shuttle Columbia. Today, Saturday, there will be a seven-hour flight of several planes at an altitude of 40 feet. Special cameras will be activated in the planes that will scan the ground for fragments. Images taken during the flights will be studied to check if the plane, known as ER-2, is able to locate fragments.

Examples of fragments not originating in Colombia were placed along the flight path, for comparison. Delivered at NASA. Search crews have so far found more than 8,100 pieces of the shuttle in Texas and Louisiana. The westernmost bone found - a piece of insulation tile - is in West Texas.
Las Vegas said on Thursday that fragments found in the Nevada desert are not from the shuttle Columbia, but the search will resume next week.
NASA spokesman Dave Darchilis said that technicians at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida examined dozens of pieces of metal as well as aluminum strips this week, and found no connection between them and the shuttle. The suspicious substance was found last week about 250 kilometers northeast of Las Vegas. So far, as mentioned, no finds of fragments west of Texas have been confirmed.

Investigators were called to the scene after radar spotted a bone falling into eastern Nevada and western Utah after the ferry passed through on February 1 before crashing in Texas. It was explained that it was a landing pad, but so far it has not been found.
 

Leave a Reply

Email will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismat to prevent spam messages. Click here to learn how your response data is processed.