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Improving dog cloning efficiency

One group of researchers at Seoul University previously managed to produce the world's first cloned dog - Snoopy, an Afghani dog created from adult skin cells. Now this group, without Wong, and with other minor changes, produced three more cloned dogs

 cloned dogs
More cloned puppies were recently born in the laboratory where the South Korean Wu-Suk-Wong clan used to work.
Wong left his job at Seoul National University this year after an investigation found that he had falsified data in papers he published on cloning human embryos to produce embryonic stem cells. The findings in these articles were dismissed and overturned, while Wong faces criminal charges. However, many of his former colleagues in the laboratory continue the cloning research.

One group of researchers at Seoul University previously managed to produce the world's first cloned dog - Snoopy, an Afghani dog created from adult skin cells.

Now this group, without Wong, and with other minor changes, produced three more cloned dogs. The puppies, whose names are "Shalom", "Tekwa" and "Tov", were born in June and July this year. Like Snoopy, they are also Afghan Hounds, but unlike Snoopy, they are female.

The achievement confirms that female puppies can be cloned just as easily as male puppies, and shows that the efficiency of dog cloning can be improved.

Fewer eggs, more puppies

Cloning dogs to order. Image: depositphotos.com
Cloning dogs to order. Image: depositphotos.com

When Snoopy was announced as coming into the world, scientists were impressed by the technical achievement of dog cloning - a task that was known to be technically possible but very, very difficult. If it is possible to significantly improve the efficiency of the cloning process and reproduce an entire canine of dogs, it is possible that in the future it will be possible to use this research in models of humans and human diseases.

Byung-Chu-Lee, head of the research group, says the group has improved the efficiency of the replication technique. In the current work, the group implanted 167 cloned embryos into 12 carrier females and received three live puppies. Before that, the group implanted 1095 cloned embryos into 123 carrier females and received only two puppies, Snoopy and another dog that died immediately after birth.

A significant jump in efficiency was also reported in Wong's 2004 and 2005 human embryo replication papers.

"These reports indicate a significant improvement in a very short time frame" says Christopher Scott of the "Stem Cells and Society" program at the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics in Palo Alto, California. According to him, he is still not convinced and still does not accept the claims for a significant improvement of the replication process until these results can be independently repeated and confirmed.

Other scientists say that the achievement is conceivable, because this is where the group's expertise is characterized. They are very good at producing cloned animals, so it is likely that they will succeed in improving the reproduction processes.

For information on the subject in Nature

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