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The second spacewalk to upgrade the Hubble: replacing the gyroscope sensors and batteries that provide electricity at night

NASA has not yet said when the astronauts will try to install the wide-field camera #3 that failed on the first spacewalk

Astronauts Mike Massimo and Mike Goode at the start of the second spacewalk to upgrade the Hubble Space Telescope, May 15, 2009
Astronauts Mike Massimo and Mike Goode at the start of the second spacewalk to upgrade the Hubble Space Telescope, May 15, 2009

Astronomers Mike Good and Mike Massimo began the second spacewalk of the STS-125 mission to upgrade the Hubble Space Telescope, today at 08:49 EST, 15:49 Israel time, and it lasted about six and a half hours.

On the two's first spacewalk, Massimo and Good devoted most of their time to replacing three units containing the Hubble Space Telescope's calibration sensors. Each unit is part of the gyroscope complex, sensing the satellite's motion and providing rating data to help the telescope make accurate science observations.

After installing the new sensors, the two performed the first part of Hubble's battery replacement mission. They were working in bay #2 of the telescope to replace the first two batteries. Each component weighs about 200 kg and contains three batteries. These batteries provide the electrical power that supports the operation of the telescope during the night part of its orbit (the telescope orbits the Earth every hour and a half, and half of the orbit time it is in the planet's shadow - that is, it experiences night). The second battery pack will be installed during the fifth and final spacewalk.

NASA has not yet said when the astronauts will attempt to install the wide-field planetary camera #3 that was supposed to be carried out on the first spacewalk, but failed."

3 תגובות

  1. Lol,
    In moments like these I regret not having a television to witness such events.

    On the other hand, we are already used to hearing people who are ignorant in certain fields ("certain" is polite) talk about them and combine them with their musings and nonsense without really understanding what they are talking about. On the other hand... unfortunately they don't really care.

  2. Lol
    Deutsch, the forecaster on channel 2 brought the photo of the shuttle against the background of the sun..
    The title of the picture: "Closest to the Sun". And the forecaster explains that although 150 million km is far enough from the sun, it is relatively very close to the sun.

    Did we say idiots?

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