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The dark doubles of galaxies

Alex Doron

It is possible that the universe has a "dark and mysterious side" - shadow galaxies, or "doubles", which are not composed of stars but only of "dark matter". This is what three scientists from the University of Cambridge, Dr. Neil Trentham, Ole Muller and Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz claim, who published an article about it in the British Royal Astronomical Society's Monthly.

In their opinion, instead of these galaxies being made up of glowing stars and gas, they are made up of a "dark black hole", aka the invisible substance that, according to many scientists, makes up about 90 percent of the universe.

The British scientists also claim that the number of dark matter galaxies is a hundred times greater than the number of galaxies containing stars.

There is evidence, from previous studies, that the normal, bright and luminous galaxies also contain dark matter. Its mass is ten times greater than the mass of all the other stars in them.

The scientists working in this field claim that they learn about the existence of dark matter in the universe only theoretically, or rather circumstantially - based on the calculation of the movement of the stars that are under the influence of gravity. In some galaxies, where there are a lot of cold bodies - dead stars like white dwarfs or black holes - there are so few stars that if it weren't for the force of gravity that affects them, a kind of invisible-matter that is used as a kind of glue to hold the stars - they would have long since dispersed and disappeared - Dissipating in the infinite expanses of the universe.

One of the examples of this argument: a galaxy labeled UGC-10214 has a flow of matter, bursting out of it as if it were in a "tug of war" with another galaxy. This matter moves towards an infinite destination.

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