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Research: The decline in the quality of scientific research in Israel and the increase in social disparities will hinder growth

A new study, prepared for the Caesarea conference to be held this week, brings up alarming findings about significant population groups in Israel

A new study, prepared for the Caesarea conference to be held this week, brings up alarming findings about significant population groups in Israel. The study was prepared by a team led by Eli Horvitz, chairman of Teva and winner of the Israel Economic Prize, Elhanan Helfman. The study states that population groups that include the ultra-Orthodox population, the Israeli Arabs, the Bedouins and members of the Ethiopian tribe are the weakest populations in Israel, who suffer from an extremely high level of poverty, an extremely low participation rate in the workforce and an extremely low level of human capital - "which is a growing burden on the growth potential of The Israeli economy".

The study also points out that "there is currently no economic model in Israel that guarantees a high scientific level over time and that government participation has undergone a substantial cut without finding alternative sources of funding." The researchers who conducted the study, which will be fully presented to the public during the week, warn that Israel's scientific level in the future is being eroded and that this problem is particularly serious in view of the competitive threats to Israel's economy from other developing countries.

The members of the team who conducted the study suggested that in order to deal with the growing social disparities in Israeli society, a policy should be adopted to promote the weaker groups in Israel, which includes removing negative incentives to integrate into the labor market, encouraging entrepreneurship in backward sectors, facilitating access to workplaces through improving infrastructure, establishing incentives for hiring high-skilled workers -Tech in the periphery and more.

According to researchers, in order to maintain Israel's technological position, the science and technology infrastructure, most of which is located and being developed in the research universities, must be strengthened, and this, among other things, by redefining the funding system, reexamining the nature of the R&D most worthy of support and encouraging the formation of Israeli corporations which may be large R&D consumers.

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