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Explanation of a strange cosmic phenomenon: astrophysicists discovered why there are no spiral galaxies in our supergalactic plane

Astrophysicists have discovered why spiral galaxies like our Milky Way are rare in the supergalactic plane, a dense region of our local universe

Astrophysicists say they have found an answer to the question of why spiral galaxies like our Milky Way are largely absent from a part of our local world called the supergalactic plane.

The supergalactic plane is a huge flattened structure spanning nearly a billion light-years, in which our Milky Way galaxy is embedded.

The plane is dotted with bright elliptical galaxies, but bright disc galaxies with spiral arms are conspicuously rare.

Now a team led jointly by the University of Durham in England and the University of Helsinki in Finland says that different distributions of elliptical and disc galaxies arise naturally because of the contrasting environments found inside and outside the plane.

This image, showing an elliptical galaxy (left) and a spiral galaxy (right) includes nearby AA light from the James Webb Space Telescope and UV light seen from the Hubble Space Telescope. Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, Rogier Windhorst (ASU), William Keel ( University of Alabama), Stuart Wyithe (University of Melbourne), JWST PEARLS Team, Alyssa Pagan (STScI)
This image, showing an elliptical galaxy (left) and a spiral galaxy (right) includes nearby AA light from the James Webb Space Telescope and UV light seen from the Hubble Space Telescope. Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, Rogier Windhorst (ASU), William Keel (University of Alabama), Stuart Wyithe (University of Melbourne), JWST PEARLS Team, Alyssa Pagan (STScI)

In the dense galaxy clusters found in the supergalactic plane, galaxies frequently undergo interactions and mergers with other galaxies. This turns spiral galaxies into elliptical galaxies – smooth galaxies with no visible internal structure or spiral arms – and leads to the development of supermassive black holes.

In contrast, far from the plane, galaxies can evolve in relative isolation, which helps them maintain their spiral structure.

The Milky Way is part of the supergalactic plane, which contains several large galaxy clusters and thousands of individual galaxies. The vast majority of galaxies found here are elliptical galaxies.

The research team used the SIBELIUS supercomputer simulation (simulations beyond the local universe), which follows the evolution of the universe for 13.8 billion years from the early universe to the present day.

The distribution of the brightest galaxies in the local universe, observed in the 2MASS survey (left part) and reproduced in the SIBELIUS simulation (right part). Both sections show projections in supergalactic coordinates, down to about a hundred megafarsecs. The almost vertical empty bar represents the region of the sky that is hidden behind our Milky Way galaxy. The simulation accurately reproduces the structures seen in the local universe. Credit: Dr Till Sawala
The distribution of the brightest galaxies in the local universe, observed in the 2MASS survey (left part) and reproduced in the SIBELIUS simulation (right part). Both sections show projections in supergalactic coordinates, down to about a hundred megafarsecs. The almost vertical empty bar represents the region of the sky that is hidden behind our Milky Way galaxy. The simulation accurately reproduces the structures seen in the local universe. Credit: Dr Till Sawala

In most cosmological simulations, random bits of the universe are examined, which cannot be directly compared to observations, but the goal of SIBELIUS is to accurately reproduce the observed structures, including the supergalactic plane. The final visualization is a remarkable match for observations of our universe through telescopes.

Co-author of the study Professor Carlos Frank said: "The distribution of galaxies in the supergalactic plane is indeed amazing. It is rare but not entirely anomalous: our imaging reveals the intimate details of galaxy formation such as the transformation of spirals to ellipticals through galaxy mergers. In addition, the simulation shows that our standard model of the universe, based on the idea that most of its mass is cold dark matter, can reproduce the most amazing structures in the universe, including the spectacular structure of which the Milky Way is a part."

More of the topic in Hayadan:

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  1. The neural theory and the stars of the universe.

    The stars in the neural universe do not move in a straight line, nor do they move in a closed circular line.
    The stars in the neural universe move in a line that can be seen in any simple screw.
    The Borgi line has two data: the diameter of the line track, and the angle of advancement of this line.
    An ant that will move in the slot of a screw, will surround the screw, and will also move along it.
    This is how the stars move - they circle at a certain speed and at a certain angle of advancement,
    An imaginary cylinder of a certain diameter, so they are both encompassing and progressive.

    The moon both orbits the earth, and moves forward with the earth.
    The earth both revolves around the sun and moves forward with it.
    The sun also orbits another star, and moves forward with it.
    Such a description is also suitable for the movement of dashes (the common name - galaxies),
    Circle A surrounds Circle B in B, and you are also progressing.
    All the compasses of the universe are combined with the "comprehensive and advanced" method and all the stars in the world are combined with the "comprehensive and advanced" method.

    The universe is made up of hyphens
    The compass of the earth contains only the moon that circles the earth and also moves forward.
    The solar compass contains the Earth compass, the Mars compass, the Jupiter compass, and more
    The Kastina compass contains the solar compass
    The Prometheus compass contains the Castine compass
    A sweet potato mash contains the Prometheus mash
    And so on

    The whole universe is a huge circle, moving in infinite space full of passive time and energy
    in a straight line and at a speed of C12
    The image of the entire universe can only be seen by an imaginary viewer who is completely at rest.
    A casual observer can also measure the speed of the universe.
    Every human observer is always moving, so he will never see the picture of the universe, nor will he
    will be able to measure the speed of the universe.
    A human observer has no explanation for the very existence of such a universe, except for the explanation of creation
    There is no explanation for this, that the infinite space is full of passive time and energy.
    Passive time, hyphens, spiral orbits of stars, are part of the theory
    The neural theory that came to replace the physical theories that preceded it.

    A. Asbar

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