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long image captionThis is part of the Evolution of the Universe Early Science Survey (CEERS), consisting of several near-infrared points from the NIRCam (Near Infrared Camera) camera on the James Webb Space Telescope. These observations are being made in the same region studied by the Hubble Space Telescope, known as the Extended Groth Belt. Arrows showing the directions north and east show the direction of the image in the sky. It should be noted that the relationship between north and east in the sky (as seen from below) is reversed compared to the half directions on the map of the earth (as seen from above). The image shows invisible near-infrared wavelengths converted to visible colors. The color key shows which NIRCam filters were used to collect the light. The name color of each filter is the visible color that represents the infrared light passing through that filter. The barrel ruler is marked with arc-seconds which are a measure of angular distance in the sky. One arc-second is equal to an angular measurement of 1/3600 of one degree. There are 60 arc-minutes in a degree and 60 arc-seconds in an arc-minute. (The full moon has an angular diameter of about 30 arc-minutes.) The actual size of an object that covers one arc-second in the sky depends on its distance from the telescope. Credit: NASA, European Space Agency (ESA), Canadian Space Agency (CSA), Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), Steve Finkelstein (University of Texas at Austin)

long image captionThis is part of the Evolution of the Universe Early Science Survey (CEERS), consisting of several near-infrared points from the NIRCam (Near Infrared Camera) camera on the James Webb Space Telescope. These observations are being made in the same region studied by the Hubble Space Telescope, known as the Extended Groth Belt. Arrows showing the directions north and east show the direction of the image in the sky. It should be noted that the relationship between north and east in the sky (as seen from below) is reversed compared to the half directions on the map of the earth (as seen from above). The image shows invisible near-infrared wavelengths converted to visible colors. The color key shows which NIRCam filters were used to collect the light. The name color of each filter is the visible color that represents the infrared light passing through that filter. The barrel ruler is marked with arc-seconds which are a measure of angular distance in the sky. One arc-second is equal to an angular measurement of 1/3600 of one degree. There are 60 arc-minutes in a degree and 60 arc-seconds in an arc-minute. (The full moon has an angular diameter of about 30 arc-minutes.) The actual size of an object that covers one arc-second in the sky depends on its distance from the telescope. Credit: NASA, European Space Agency (ESA), Canadian Space Agency (CSA), Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), Steve Finkelstein (University of Texas at Austin)

Long image caption

It is part of the Early Science Survey of the Evolution of the Universe (CEERS), which consists of several near-infrared points from the NIRCam (Near Infrared Camera) camera on the James Webb Space Telescope. These observations are being made in the same region studied by the Hubble Space Telescope, known as the Extended Groth Belt.

Arrows showing the directions north and east show the direction of the image in the sky. It should be noted that the relationship between north and east in the sky (as seen from below) is reversed compared to the half directions on the map of the earth (as seen from above).

The image shows invisible near-infrared wavelengths converted to visible colors. The color key shows which NIRCam filters were used to collect the light. The name color of each filter is the visible color that represents the infrared light passing through that filter.

The barrel ruler is marked with arc-seconds which are a measure of angular distance in the sky. One arc-second is equal to an angular measurement of 1/3600 of one degree. There are 60 arc-minutes in a degree and 60 arc-seconds in an arc-minute. (The full moon has an angular diameter of about 30 arc-minutes.) The actual size of an object that covers one arc-second in the sky depends on its distance from the telescope.

Credit: NASA, European Space Agency (ESA), Canadian Space Agency (CSA), Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), Steve Finkelstein (University of Texas at Austin)

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